Faculty

The diverse interests and expertise of the Clinic faculty provide a variety of opportunities for experiential learning. In this setting, students master client representation and counseling, case planning and strategy, and persuasive advocacy before trial courts and administrative tribunals.

Photograph: John Francis.Professor John Francis has been with the Washburn Law Clinic since 1999. Professor Francis worked for several years as a trial attorney with the New York City Legal Aid Society, Criminal Defense Division. Prior to his appointment at Washburn, Francis was a supervising attorney in the clinical program at Hofstra Law School. He has been a clinical educator since 1994.

"The clinical program at Washburn Law guides students to develop into persuasive advocates and empowers them to become ethical lawyers. I am proud of the high caliber of professional practice achieved by our students as well as the valuable service they provide to the community."

Photograph: Randall Hodgkinson.Professor Randall Hodgkinson joined the Washburn Law faculty in 2006 and supervises students in a joint endeavor between Washburn University School of Law and the Kansas Appellate Defender Office (the appellate public defender for the state of Kansas).

"I enjoy working with students on real felony appeals. The transition from academic exercises to real cases with real clients is eye-opening and enriching for students. Appellate experience is so valuable in many types of diverse practice areas after law school."

Photograph: Janet Thompson Jackson.Professor Janet Thompson Jackson joined the Washburn Law faculty in 2004 and is Co-Director for the 2012-2013 academic year. She previously was a Clinical Fellow at the University of Baltimore School of Law and an Adjunct at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law teaching legal writing and civil rights law.

"The Law Clinic allows for a well-supervised transition from classroom student to legal counsel for under-represented groups and individuals. Students gain exposure to a broad range of legal issues and develop legal and problem-solving skills they will use in their legal practice and in life."

Photograph: Lynette Petty.Professor Lynette Petty has been with the Law Clinic since 1992. She was formerly managing attorney of a Legal Services office, and worked on domestic, public benefit, and disability issues.

"Our clinic students come from a variety of backgrounds and bring diverse experiences. An attorney must be able to recognize and take account of the differences of those they represent. he clinic offers students the opportunity to explore these issues and develop the skills to effectively counsel people seeking legal assistance."

Photograph: Curt Waugh.Curtis J. Waugh, Visiting Associate Professor of Law and Co-Director for the 2012-2013 academic year, joined the Clinic in 2003, and has supervised interns in a range of civil cases. Before he joined the Clinic, he practiced for 16 years with the Topeka firm of Goodell, Stratton, Edmonds & Palmer, primarily in the areas of civil litigation and appellate practice.

"Because of the fine rapport between students and faculty at Washburn Law, the Law Clinic serves as an effective advocate for its clients' interests and enriches students' law school experience."