Photograph: Students in a classroom.

First Week Overview for Spring 2016 Incoming Students

Updated Friday, November 20, 2016.


Washburn Law's First Week Program, which begins on Tuesday, January 12, 2016, for Spring 2016 incoming students, helps you become accustomed to the study of law in a supportive, introductory environment. In the interest of planning, you should prepare yourself for full days.

First Week Theme: Professionalism in the Law

You should begin thinking about professionalism early in your career. Some of the following assignments directly address professionalism. All of them help prepare you for a professional career in the law.

Assignments: Readings to Be Completed Before January 12th

In preparation for First Week you should read the following before arriving on January 12 (subject to updating).

Professor Bahadur’s Assignment for January 13-15 (required)

Professor Bahadur would like you to read and brief these five (5) cases (97 KB PDF). You should have a completed brief for each case with you on the first day of class (i.e., January 13) when you will also be assessed on your preparation.

Background Readings on Professionalism for August 12 and August 15 (required)

Background Readings Helpful for First Week and Law School in General (optional—will not be specifically discussed during First Week)

Reading law and briefing cases:

Court Structure:

Financial Aid

See the Financial Aid section of the Admitted Student Checklist, Spring 2016 Entering Class.

First Week Check-in

Photograph: North entrance of Washburn University School of Law.Incoming students are expected to check in on Tuesday morning, January 12, 2016, between 9:00 a.m. and 9:45 a.m. Please enter the law school through the north doors; the check-in process begins in Robinson Courtroom.

At check-in:

  • You will receive your First Week materials
  • You will receive a Washburn Law shirt.
  • Your photograph will be taken for the Washburn University School of Law Directory.
  • Technology staff will be available to help connect your laptop to the wireless network, verify access to your Washburn e-mail account, and give you instructions for setting your laptop to print to law school printers.

A representative from the Financial Aid Office will be available in Room 214U (library) to answer questions and address concerns.


Law school staff will formally enroll all first semester students prior to arrival on January 12, 2016. No Spring 2016 pre-enrollment steps need to be taken by incoming students.

Official Undergraduate Transcript

The accreditation standards of the American Bar Association require that an official copy of your final undergraduate transcript, demonstrating that you have received your Bachelors Degree, be on file at your law school. The transcript must be official and sent directly from the institution in which you graduated to: Washburn University School of Law, Admissions Office, 1700 SW College Ave., Topeka, KS 66621. Please note: copies of transcripts provided to LSDAS, for admissions purposes, do not fulfill this requirement.


Section assignments affect textbook purchases. You may purchase textbooks after being notified of your section assignment. See First Semester Class Schedules for information about ordering textbooks.


Tuition rates, per hour, for the 2015-2016 academic year are:

  • $686 - Resident
  • $1,071 - Non-resident

In addition, there is a $35 per semester student activity fee.

See Tuition and Costs for more information (based on 2015-2016 estimates).

Health Insurance

A Blanket Accident and Sickness Insurance plan is available to Washburn students. To learn more, see Student Health Services and Health Insurance Coverage.

Washburn University School of Law Directory

The Washburn Student Bar Association sponsors and publishes a directory of students, faculty, and staff at the beginning of each academic year. Photographs taken for the directory are also used to provide faculty with course rosters for their classes.

During check-in on Tuesday, January 12, 2016, we will take your photograph and ask you to provide/verify your address, phone number, hometown, and verify your undergraduate institution.

The directory is available in two formats: print, and electronically through a password protected area of the Washburn Law website. One copy of the print Directory is distributed to each student, faculty, and staff member at Washburn Law. Access to the electronic version of the Directory is limited to students, faculty, and staff at Washburn Law.

Although the information collected above is used to produce the Directory and by Washburn Law personnel in order serve you better during the school year, we recognize that you may not want to share some of this information outside the law school staff. When you provide your Directory information you may indicate your desire to not have one or more of the following items printed in the Directory and displayed in the electronic version:

  • Your photograph
  • Your local address
  • Your local phone number
  • Your hometown
  • Your undergraduate institution

You will receive a copy of the Directory in your information packet when you check in. Questions about the Directory may be sent to Martin Wisneski at

Optional Leisure Reading

We have identified several books related to adjusting to law school. You may find these interesting to read during your leisure time. Links to more information at, Barnes and Noble, and publisher websites are provided. Again, these are not mandatory readings.

  • General
    • Bridging the Gap Between College and Law School: Strategies for Success by Ruta K. Stropus and Charlotte D. Taylor. 3rd ed. (Carolina Academic Press, 2014) (CAP website)
    • Reading Like a Lawyer: Time-Saving Strategies for Reading Law Like an Expert by Ruth Ann McKinney. 2nd ed. (Carolina Academic Press, 2012) (CAP website)
  • How to Think About Studying Law
    • Expert Learning for Law Students by Michael Hunter Schwartz. 2nd ed. (Carolina Academic Press, 2008) (CAP website)
    • Introduction to the Study and Practice of Law by Kenney F. Hegland. 6th ed. (2014) ( | Barnes and Noble)
    • A Student's Guide to Legal Analysis by Patrick M. McFadden (2001) ( | Barnes and Noble)
  • How to Adjust Academically
  • How to Do Well On Exams
    • How to Study Law and Take Law Exams by Ann M. Burkhart and Robert A. Stein (1996) ( | Barnes and Noble)
    • How To Do Your Best on Law School Exams by John Delaney (1993) (
    • Getting to Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams by Richard Michael Fischl and Jeremy Paul (1999) ( | Barnes and Noble)